More to Explore

Courtyard Complex

Courtyard Complex

The Greenhouse and a group of buildings surrounding the brick courtyard near Linden Road were originally built as the service area for Mr. King’s Kingwood Estate. After opening to the public, they were adapted to host Kingwood Center Gardens public activities. Today, with many recent improvements, the buildings are known as the Display Greenhouse, Carriage House, and Roost Hall. They all share the bricked and shaded courtyard, a favorite venue for indoor/outdoor events.


Duck Pond

The old duck pond at the north end of the Terrace Garden has been an icon at Kingwood Center Gardens since we opened in 1953. The duck pond is thought to have been part of the original estate when Mr. King and his first wife, Edith, purchased the property in 1912.


Nature Pond

Don’t miss the beautiful Nature Pond and its peaceful cascading stream. Expanded as part of the Garden Gateway project, the Nature Pond also features native perennial plants in a variety of colors with bloom times staggered from early summer all the way through the first frost. This is a favorite area for pollinators, birds, and other wildlife.


Peacock Playhouse: The Kingwood Sensory Center

At the Peacock Playhouse, children and their families can explore nature through many different activities. There are books you can read, garden games to play, and masterpieces to create.  You can even take a rest on your Kingwood journey and watch birds and hummingbirds through the large windows of the center. 

The Peacock Playhouse is designed for self-exploration and is periodically monitored by staff throughout the day.

The Peacock Playhouse was originally the Gate House and home to the chauffeur’s office and garage space during Mr. King’s time.


Storybook Trail

Located near the Peacock Playhouse, this literacy adventure can be enjoyed by all ages! Take a stroll through a woodland path while discovering Winter Dance, by Marion Dane Bauer.

Snow is coming, and it’s time to get ready! The squirrel gathers nuts, the geese soar south, and the snowshoe hare puts on its new white coat. But what should the fox do? Each animal advises the fox that its own plan is best, but the fox thinks otherwise—yet it’s not until he meets a golden-eyed friend that he finds the perfect way to celebrate the snowfall.

Many thanks to our project partner, Mansfield-Richland County Public Library, and to the Keyser Library Fund and the George and Barbara Keyser D A Fund of Richland County Foundation who funded the establishment of the Storybook Trail. 

The 2022 Peacock Playhouse Impact Project and Porous Pave Project added many enhancements to the indoor and outdoor play spaces and accessibility on the Storybook Trail. These projects were generously funded by The Shelby Foundation.