The Importance of Fall Clean-up

By Mona Kneuss

Fall maintenance is one ways to keep your plants healthy so lets get started.
By now most of your plants are looking tired and ready to be put to bed for the winter. All of the annuals in your pots will need to be emptied and the pots emptied of their soil so they don’t freeze and brake. The soil can be stored in a plastic container with a lid of some kind to be used next year.

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Hardy Fall Blooming Perennials

By Chuck Gleaves

I searched all the pictures I have taken in October over the last six years and found far more blooming perennials than I could mention here. Many of them begin blooming in August or September but carry on well into October such as Japanese anemones. One of my favorites is Anemone x hybrida ‘Whirlwind’. There are also lots of different Asters and ornamental grasses that meet this descripton. For example, I particularly enjoy my ground hugging Aster ericoides ‘Snowflurry’ in combination with various upright stonecrops like Hylotelephium x ‘Autumn Joy’. Curiously, despite the name (Autumn Joy) the upright stonecrop is finished blooming by October, but remnants of the flowers still make a nice companion for my Aster.

Aster ericoides ‘Snow Flurry’ flowering with Hylotelephium x ‘Autumn Joy’ on October 14th.

Aster ericoides ‘Snow Flurry’ flowering with Hylotelephium x ‘Autumn Joy’ on October 14th.

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Over Wintering

By Laura Mast

This is the time of year when the temperature starts to drop, and plants begin to go dormant for the winter. There are numerous plants that you can bring in for the winter to keep from dying.  At Kingwood, we start bringing in plants from the gardens that we will use in our designs for the next year’s garden displays. One of the plants that we bring in to save is Pennisetum (ornamental grass).

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Putting Tender Herbs to Bed in the Fall

By Glenna Sheaffer

One way to keep herbs for years – especially tender perennials and shrubs – is to dig them and pot them up and bring them into the house over the winter. Of course, this works best for smaller plants that do not take up too much room. Clean off all the old discolored and dead leaves and flowers so they look tidy. This is now a houseplant in your home so it should look nice. You can cut off some far-ranging stems so the plants are more compact and will fit well on your windowsill. Try to leave about 2” of foliage left on the stems. The plant can be further cut back as it puts out new growth lower down the stem. Finish with a plant that has good foliage and maybe flowers to carry it through the winter. Herbs need direct sunlight in the winter so setting them in a South, East or West window would be ideal. Sunlight is weak in the winter so the longer you can have them in the sun the better.

herb

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Kingwood Bulb Sale

By Doug Schuster

Spring is an exciting time at Kingwood; it begins with our big kick off in the garden with the appearance of our Tulip display along with other spring bulbs in late April to early May. While the beauty of the blooming bulbs is enjoyable and a display as large as Kingwood’s is not commonplace, what most don’t realize is how long that display has been in the works. The spring bulb display is an 11-month process which begins as early as June with the design and selection of bulbs to be planted for the following year. Once we have ordered our bulbs, we then await their arrival; most tulip bulbs come all the way from Holland. They usually arrive sometime between the 3rd to 4th week of September. Here at Kingwood, we will store the bulbs until we remove our annual display and prep our landscape beds. Once the beds have been prepared, we will plant the bulbs. Usually, this takes place in mid to late October. Once planted we wait for the show.

Spring Tulips

Spring Tulips

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Herbs & Cuttings

By Glenna Shaeffer

When you need to take tender herb plants indoors to keep over the winter, you can dig the whole plant in Mid-September and bring it in.  If you do not have enough room indoors for larger plants, you can take cuttings to bring in.  Late August is the best time to take cuttings of herbs that are Mediterranean in origin.  The plant is still in active growth during this month which helps in rooting.  Later when the weather cools the plants prepare chemically for going through winter and do not root out easily again until spring.

herb

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The Carriage House Garden Edibles

By Karen Fraizer

The Carriage House Garden was planted a year ago. Part of the theme for this garden was to have an array of edible plants included in the design. We planted cherries, apples, blueberries, raspberries, pears, and hazelnuts. These are all shrubs or trees. We also added edible annuals for seasonal interest that can be changed every year. I am pleasantly surprised that some of the trees and shrubs are producing fruit in their first year.

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Hedge Trimming

By Shawn McClain

The grounds crew trims many hedges on Kingwood grounds. One particular hedge, is the hornbeam just outside of the greenhouse. Botanically known as Carpinus betulus, the hornbeam is a fast growing deciduous tree that can grow up to several feet per year. We like to maintain it using a traditional European style of pruning, so it has a nice, sculpted appearance. This means, it’s crucial that the hedge be trimmed regularly, so it doesn’t look overgrown and unruly.

It is quite a chore, but the end result is awesome.

Hedge at Kingwood

Hedge at Kingwood

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