Category Archives: Articles from our Gardeners

Hedge Trimming

By Shawn McClain

The grounds crew trims many hedges on Kingwood grounds. One particular hedge, is the hornbeam just outside of the greenhouse. Botanically known as Carpinus betulus, the hornbeam is a fast growing deciduous tree that can grow up to several feet per year. We like to maintain it using a traditional European style of pruning, so it has a nice, sculpted appearance. This means, it’s crucial that the hedge be trimmed regularly, so it doesn’t look overgrown and unruly.

It is quite a chore, but the end result is awesome.

Hedge at Kingwood

Hedge at Kingwood

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Care of Summer Perennials

By Glenna Sheaffer

You would think there should be little to do with perennials in the summer, but they have certain needs to either help them to re-bloom or to be tidy. After a plant like a daylily or hosta is done blooming, the flower stalks should be cut down below the foliage. Daylilies can go to seed and the individual flowers can be deadheaded to keep the plant looking fresh. When you deadhead make sure you pinch out the hard seedhead at the base of the bloom. A daylily’s flower only lasts one day. The next day, if you touch the blossom, it will feel slippery and be dissolving. Those are the ones to remove [remember to include the ovary at the base]. They are very different from a fresh bud coming on which has a firm feeling when touched.

KWwalkJuly

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How to Show Your Daylily

By Mona Kneuss

Showing your daylily is a great way to learn a thing or two about your plants. It is also a good way to network with others who have similar interests, they may also know a thing or two about showing plants. I would like to reassure you that showing your daylily ( or any plant for that matter ) is not hard at all. You may be surprised at how well you do, who knows even walk away with a blue ribbon or two.

daylilyblog (1)
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The Mysteries of Wisteria

By Karen Fraizer

For too many people, me included, the thought of growing Wisteria can cause nightmares. Kingwood recently planted a variety called Amethyst Falls Wisteria in the new Carriage House Garden. This is an American Wisteria, which is supposed to be smaller and slower growing than its oriental cousins. Now that spring is upon us I have been thinking that it’s time to start training these four Wisteria plants, which also got me thinking about how little I actually know about this plant. So in order to care for and prune them properly I’m going to have to do some research.

Wisteria

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Garlic Mustard

By Shawn McClain

On April 22nd for Earth Day, one of the most common practices of celebration is to plant new trees. Other practices of celebration include picking up trash, planting wildflowers and cleaning up streams. In my case, removal of invasive species from the woodland area here at Kingwood Center Gardens, particularly Garlic Mustard. This ecologically invasive and non- native plant easily naturalizes in shady locations and spreads viable seeds early in the spring pushing out many wildflowers and native plants.

Garlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard

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Iris

By Mona Kneuss

There are around 300 species in the genus Iris. In this area we have Tall bearded irises or Iris germanica a very familiar flower with the three inner upright petals called “standards” and three larger outer petals called “falls”, the falls may have beards or crests. These are soft hairs along the center of the falls. In Crested iris the hairs form a comb or ridge.

Tall Bearded Iris

Tall Bearded Iris

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