Anticipating Spring Gardens

by Chuck Gleaves, Executive Director

At Kingwood you can enjoy the daffodils by the thousands or as incredible individuals like this one

At Kingwood you can enjoy the daffodils by the thousands or as incredible individuals like this one

Spring is the most popular time at Kingwood, and we have lots to see. Over the years our gardens have become more nuanced that just a gazillion tulips, although we have far from forsaken the brilliant spring color that tulips provide. Many thousands of daffodils bloom sequentially over about a six-week period, typically from late March to early May, although as I write this on the second to last day of February there are already one or two daffodils in bloom.

We have a massive magnolia display, although early spring warm-ups have set the stage for mid-spring frost damage the last two years in a row, and this spring is already showing signs of being early as well. (Do I detect a pattern developing?) Over the last fifteen years we have added many yellow magnolias to supplement the wide array of pink and white blooming varieties that have been here for many years.

Yellow magnolias add yet another dimension to Kingwood's spring show

Yellow magnolias add yet another dimension to Kingwood’s spring show

Magnolias, tulips and daffodils are the big players, but scores of other spring blooming plants flesh out the spring display. So-called minor bulbs, flowering shrubs, perennials and many other flowering trees such as crabapples, cherries, red buckeye, redbud, dogwood, silverbells and etc. contribute mightily, each in their time, to our spring extravaganza. Come early and often.

A foggy spring morning at Kingwood

A foggy spring morning at Kingwood

 

3 thoughts on “Anticipating Spring Gardens

  1. Johng389

    Very efficiently written post. It will be valuable to anyone who usess it, as well as myself. Keep doing what you are doing i will definitely read more posts. dcddckckaakc

    Reply
  2. heather kinsley

    Spring is coming to early. My rose has leaf buds. Perfect set up for frost damage after a mild winter. My Helleborus is covered in white flowers. Love Plant Talk and will enjoy reading your blog too.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *